Mary Bozarth appointed to Mayor’s Commission for Human Rights & Community Relations

April 22, 2019By RosieUncategorized

Mary Bozarth appointed to Mayor’s Commission for Human Rights & Community Relations

Rosie is excited to announce the appointment of Mary Bozarth to the Mayor’s Commission for Human Rights & Community Relations. Bozarth’s term will begin in June.

Mary Bozarth

Rosie is excited to celebrate the appointment of Joy Martin to the Greene County Domestic Violence Shelter Board.

Bozarth serves as In-House Counsel at Little Sunshine Enterprises in addition to serving as an instructor at Missouri State in the criminology department. Bozarth is active in a number of community organizations, including the Junior League of Springfield, where she serves as the Assistant Chair of New Membership. Bozarth currently serves on the board of directors for the Diaper Bank of the Ozarks, Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland, and Springfield Little Theatre in addition to her role on the statewide Child Abuse & Neglect Review Board. Bozarth resides in Springfield with her husband, Chris, and her two children, Madeline and Theodore.

Mayor’s Commission for Human Rights & Community Relations

The Mayor’s Commission on Human Rights and Community Relations works to promote understanding and respect among all citizens and provides the community recourse for discriminatory acts.

The commission investigates alleged incidents of discrimination and tries to mediate settlements between affected parties. The commission acts as a clearing house for information regarding human rights and offers its services to help educate interested citizens and community groups.

Rosie virtual book club returns for round two

October 23, 2018By RosieUncategorized

Rosie virtual book club returns for round two

Rosie virtual book club returns for round two

Rosie’s programming committee is excited to announce plans for the second round of Rosie’s virtual book club.

Rosie’s virtual book club is the perfect way to connect with other members over new ideas. Book club members are connected via a private Facebook group where moderators will share prompts, ask questions, and facilitate discussion. The book club first started in July of 2018 with members reading You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero.

Now the group is back and ready to tackle their second book, Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis.

Members of the programming committee will share the chapter schedule with book club members on October 29th and the first round of discussion questions will be posted on November 5th.

Members will have the chance to connect offline with a meetup at the end of the book.

About Girl, Wash Your Face: “Drawing from her life experiences as a lifestyle guru, the author presents a guide to becoming a joyous, confident woman by breaking the cycle of negativity and burnout and pursuing a life of exuberance. With unflinching faith– and rock-hard tenacity– Hollis shows readers how to give yourself grace without giving up.”

Join the Facebook group today – and don’t forget to turn on your notifications!

Melanie McDermott appointed to Springfield Little Theatre Associate Board

September 5, 2018By RosieUncategorized

Melanie McDermott appointed to Springfield Little Theatre Associate Board

Rosie is excited to announce that Melanie McDermott has been appointed to Springfield Little Theatre’s Associate Board

Melanie McDermott

Melanie is the owner and operator of Springfield’s Maid at Home LLC, which provides housekeeping, private event management and personal organizational services to 417’s most fistidious homes and estates. 

Melanie has also recently founded the MASV (Mothers Against School Violence) Movement to unite mothers as a collective political and community front to further combat the violence in America’s schools. Melanie is proudly serving her third term as Vice President on the PTO at Willard Orchard Hills Elementary School and happily leads the Juniors for Girl Scout Troop 71665. 

Melanie has two children and loves the spectrum of art in Springfield to which she one days hope to add her own personal contribution. Melanie has a strong desire to see all women (and men!) achieve their personal and professional best and is a very proud Rosie member. She is thrilled to begin service to the Springfield Little Theatre to combine her professional and personal dreams for the community arts and betterment. 

Originally from New York, Melanie has gladly called Springfield, Missouri home for over 20 years.

Springfield Little Theatre Associate Board

The Springfield Little Theatre organization was founded in 1934 and purchased what was known as the Landers Theatre in 1970. The theatre is the largest civic theatre operation in Missouri and one of the largest in mid-America, producing a mainstage season of nine plays and musicals that are attended by some 60,000 Southwest Missourians annually.

Rosie launches virtual book club for members

July 6, 2018By RosieUncategorized

Rosie launches virtual book club for members

Whether you’re a regular bookworm or just hoping to check ‘Read one book’ off your 2018 To-Do List, we’ve got a new (virtual) club for you!

Rosie’s virtual book club is the perfect way to connect with other members over new ideas. Book club members are connected via a private Facebook group where moderators will share prompts, ask questions, and facilitate discussion. The book club is managed by members of Rosie’s programming committee.

Members will have the chance to connect offline with a meetup at the end of each book.

The first book for the book club is You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero.

About You Are a Badass: “Bestselling author, speaker and world-traveling success coach, Jen Sincero, cuts through the din of the self-help genre with her own verbal meat cleaver in You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life. In this refreshingly blunt how-to guide, Sincero, serves up 27 bite-sized chapters full of hilariously inspiring stories, life-changing insights, easy exercises and the occasional swear word.”

The book club goes live on Monday, July 16, 2018

Heidi Crane named to United Way of the Ozarks’ Board of Directors

March 22, 2018By RosieUncategorized

Heidi Crane named to United Way of the Ozarks’ Board of Directors

We’re excited to share that Heidi Crane has been named to United Way of the Ozarks’ Board of Directors

Heidi Crane

Heidi is owner and Chief Financial Officer at Copy Products, Inc., a locally owned office technologies provider that has been in business since 1963.  She and her husband Erik are both very active in the day to day operations at CPI. In addition to her board service with United Way of the Ozarks,  Heidi is also a member of the board of directors with both CASA and Care to Learn. She is a sustaining member of the Junior League of Springfield, a Rosie member, the Spouse/Family officer for the local Young President’s Organization (YPO), and a mother to two children: Emily (24) and Ethan (20).

United Way of the Ozarks’ Board of Director

The mission of United Way of the Ozarks is to improve lives by raising funds and uniting support around our communities’ critical needs and red flags. The board of directors is responsible for guiding the organization’s actions and ensuring key objectives are met. Made up entirely of volunteers, the board meets monthly to discuss strategic issues facing the organization. The board holds United Way’s senior staff responsible for carrying out the organization’s mission, and as community leaders, they ensure United Way of the Ozarks is an organization you can trust.

Katy Spencer named to Diaper Bank of the Ozarks’ Board of Directors

February 20, 2018By RosieUncategorized

Katy Spencer named to Diaper Bank of the Ozarks’ Board of Directors

Rosie member Katy Spencer has accepted an appointment to the Diaper Bank of the Ozarks’ Board of Directors.

Katy Spencer

Katy Spencer is a member of the University Advancement team at Drury University and is currently pursuing her Masters in Nonprofit and Civic Leadership at Drury. She is using the skills she learns in that program not only in her daily job, but now in her role on the Board of Diaper Bank of the Ozarks. She resides in Springfield with her husband, Adam, and her son, Charlie.

Diaper Bank of the Ozarks’ Board of Directors

The Diaper Bank of the Ozarks was established to keep our community’s babies healthy and happy by providing access to diapers for families in need and through education concerning alternative diapering options that promote health and financial responsibility. The Diaper Bank of the Ozarks has touched the lives of over 25,000 babies over the past four years by distributing over 1,000,000 disposable diapers and over 200 cloth diaper starter kits. Between 40,000 and 50,000 diapers are donated to 35 local partner agencies in Greene County and other rural partners reaching into 22 of our outlying counties, who then distribute to families in need. 

Bekah Olson named to Ozarks Counseling Center Board of Directors

February 15, 2018By RosieUncategorized

Bekah Olson named to Ozarks Counseling Center Board of Directors

Rosie is excited to announce that member Bekah Olson has been appointed to serve on the Board of Directors of the Betty and Bobby Allison Ozarks Counseling Center.

Bekah Olson

Olson has a passion for ‘telling stories that hit home for people.’ She has six years of experience in content marketing, information design, and technical communication. She currently serves as a search engine optimization (SEO) specialist at Campaignium in addition to serving as a freelance writer for 417 Magazine. She is an active community member and resides in Springfield with her husband, Ben. 

Ozarks Counseling Center Board of Directors

The Betty and Bobby Allison Ozarks Counseling Center was established in 1952 as the Greene County Child Abuse Clinic. The first child guidance clinic in the area, it was established to treat emotional and behavioral problems of children. Not long after, the clinic expanded to serve patients of all ages and was renamed Ozarks Counseling Center. The OCC serves clients from all over southwest Missouri and from all walks of life with quality and affordable counseling. 

Mary Bozarth named to Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland Board of Directors

November 14, 2017By RosieUncategorized

Mary Bozarth named to Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland Board of Directors

Mary Bozarth named to Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland Board of Directors.

Mary Bozarth

Bozarth serves as In-House Counsel at Little Sunshine Enterprises in addition to serving as an instructor at Missouri State in the criminology department. Bozarth is active in a number of community organizations, including the Junior League of Springfield, where she serves as the Assistant Chair of New Membership. Bozarth currently serves on the board of directors for the Diaper Bank of the Ozarks and Springfield Little Theatre in addition to her role on the statewide Child Abuse & Neglect Review Board. Bozarth resides in Springfield with her husband, Chris, and her daughter, Madeline. 

Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland Board of Directors

The Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland strive to build girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. The Girl Scouts organization is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. With programs from coast to coast and across the globe, Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure, and success. 

The Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland team serves over 12,500 girls and 4,000 adults across 68 counties in central and southern Missouri, southeast Kansas, and northeast Oklahoma. 

Rachel Fuhrman named to Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland Board of Directors

November 14, 2017By RosieUncategorized

Rachel Fuhrman named to Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland Board of Directors

Rosie member Rachel Fuhrman has been appointed to the Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heatland Board of Directors.

Rachel Fuhrman

Fuhrman provides support to partners at Ellis, Ellis, Hammson & Johnson as a certified paralegal with nearly ten years of experience in the legal field. She is an active community member and currently serves as the Manager of Communications with the Junior League of Springfield, MO. Rachel is an active member of Rosie and serves as a member of the membership committee. 

Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heatland Board of Directors

The Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland strive to build girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. The Girl Scouts organization is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. With programs from coast to coast and across the globe, Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure, and success. 

The Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland team serves over 12,500 girls and 4,000 adults across 68 counties in central and southern Missouri, southeast Kansas, and northeast Oklahoma. 

Woman of the Week: Maria Tallchief

November 3, 2017By RosieUncategorized

Woman of the Week: Maria Tallchief

Maria Tallchief

“Above all, I wanted to be appreciated as a prima ballerina who happened to be a Native American, never as someone who was an American Indian ballerina.”

  Maria Tallchief was born in Fairfax, Oklahoma, on January 24, 1925. Her father, Alexander Joseph Tallchief, was a member of the Osage Nation; while her mother, Ruth Porter, was of Scottish and Irish decent. Tallchief’s paternal great-grandfather, Peter Bigheart, helped negotiate matters concerning oil revenues that enriched the Osage Nation. As a result of these negotiations Tallchief’s father grew up wealthy and never had to work a day in his life. Her childhood home was a 10 room terracotta-brick house that stood on a hill overlooking the reservation. Although she was privileged financially, her family was not without its problems. Tallchief’s father was a binge drinker, and her parents would often be found fighting about money.

              Ruther Tallchief had dreamed of becoming a performer in her own childhood, but was unable to pursue this dream because her family could not afford lessons. Ruth did not want this to be the case for her own children, and quickly enrolled them in different types of the performing arts. At the age of three Tallchief began to take ballet and piano lessons. In 1930, a ballet teacher from Tulsa, Mrs. Sabin, and visited Fairfax looking for potential students and quickly took in Tallchief and her young sister Marjorie. Looking back on the experience Tallchief remarked that it was a miracle that she wasn’t permanently harmed from lessons with Mrs. Sabin because the teacher had Tallchief begin pointe ballet at the age of 5, which is far too young to expect a dancer to perform pointe without injury. During this same time Tallchief’s school teachers were impressed with her reading abilities and allowed her to skip two grade levels.

              In 1933, the family moved to Los Angeles with the intent of the children getting into Hollywood Musicals. The California schools proved to be a personal challenge to Tallchief; even though she found the academics to be easy, she faced painful discrimination from her peers and took to spelling her name as one word. At the age of 12 Tallchief’s life began to shift focus more toward ballet when she met Bronislava Nijinska. Nijinska was a renowned choreographer who had recently opened up a ballet studio in LA. It was the teachings of Nijinska that made Tallchief want to pursue a career as a ballerina. Tallchief realized that being a ballerina was a full-time task and required all of her passion. She described working with Nijinska as, “We didn’t concentrate only for an hour and a half a day, we lived [ballet].”  In 1942, Tallchief graduated from Beverly Hills High School and set out for New York City at the age of 17.

              Once in New York Tallchief sought out Serge Denham and was hired as a temporary dancer because she had one thing that many of his current dancers did not, a passport. With a Canadian tour coming up Denham needed dancers that could cross the border, and many of his Russian emigres could not. After the tour Tallchief was offered a full time position with the troupe because one of the dancers had quit due to a pregnancy. Tallchief continued to work hard and study what her superiors were doing differently than her, that way she could grow as a ballerina. In 1943, the lead ballerina Nathalie Krassovska left the company Tallchief was at, and she was called up to dance Krassovska’s role.

              Tallchief’s career would permanently change in the spring of 1944, when she met well known choreographer George Balanchine. He was hired by the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo to work on a new production called Song of Norway. Tallchief was assigned a solo position and was given the understudy to the lead role. The ballet was such a success that Balanchine was contracted for the rest of the season with the company. As the season went on Balanchine continued to give roles to Tallchief, but he also began to tutor her. Under Balanchine’s instruction Tallchief lost ten pounds, elongated her neck and legs, and learned how to hold her chest high, keep her back straight, and keep her feet arched. All of these lessons paid off when Tallchief was promoted to the rank of featured soloist within the company.

              The relationship between Balanchine and Tallchief was mostly professional, as Tallchief was ignorant to the attraction Balanchine had for her. Over time the two became good friends, until one day Balanchine unexpectedly asked Tallchief to marry him. After some consideration Tallchief agreed and the couple was married on August 16, 1946.

              Maria Tallchief’s career was at its height in 1948 when she became not only the first prima ballerina of Native American heritage of the New York City Ballet, but the first prima ballerina of the New York City Ballet. Tallchief was extremely popular at this time and was requested to perform about 8 times each week. She also featured in several ballets, including the 1954, reworked version of, the then obscure ballet, The Nutcracker. Tallchief’s performance was credited with being one of the reasons that the Christmas classic transformed into one of the industry’s most reliable box office draws.

              With all of the success that Tallchief gained in her time as a ballerina she decided to retire in 1966. She expressed her concern to her husband that she wanted to retire before dancing beyond her prime, and Balanchine persuaded her to give her final performance in Peter van Dyk’s Cinderella as the title role.

              Maria Tallchief leaped into the hearts of Americans with the beauty and grace she displayed while dancing. Historically, Tallchief’s career occurred in a time of many wars and resentment; but Tallchief transcended all of that for the sake of perusing what she loved. In her mind the only identity that she had that mattered to her was that she was a dancer. In her eyes she just happened to be a woman and Native American; but she was destined to be a ballerina. There is something to be said for that philosophy: identify yourself by what you love rather than society’s preconceived notions.